The benefits of Blu-Ray, as explained by a bot I paid $20

In recent months, I’ve been looking for ways to speed up the process of writing for this blog. Today, I considered that one way of doing that might be to use a bot that would write articles based on a short description of the topic and I would use it as a starting point to create this websites. Clearly this was a terrible idea.

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Sex ban is a band-aid solution, corruption ban would be a cure

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull today announced that the ministerial code of conduct will be amended to explicitly prohibit sexual relations between Ministers and their staff. The problem? It doesn’t actually fix the problem that the people have with Joyce.

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Zed Seselja ignores democratic mandate his party manufactured

April 14, 2019: Updates for clarity and removing errors

The proposed second stage of the light rail system in Canberra has a snag – it’s passing through land reserved to the Federal Government – and traitorous senator Zed Seselja really wants you to know that.

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Pessimism–a short rant

Originally from my Facebook, May 2017.

Gee, I can’t imagine why this generation is so pessimistic. It’s not like this generation is constantly being lectured about how privileged we are by a generation who (to use a sweeping generalisation) abuse negative gearing, own all the media, sell our natural resources tax-free, pollute our atmosphere, ship our tertiary-industry jobs to primary-industry cities (APVMA) and complain that we aren’t generous enough, cut penalty rates during a period of record profit, plant sycophants in our public institutions, cut their own taxes with whatever money they have left that would normally be taxed being shipped off to George Town, and now they are legitimately confused as to why we don’t want university fees to rise by 7.5% when their fees were – quite literally, without exaggeration or hyperbole – 100% lower than this generation’s.

But no, unlike those oppressed millionaires who just want a bit of relief, we’re the overly privileged paleo-pear-and-banana-bread slamming, parent’s-house-dwelling, dole bludging, 2-PC-4-me Generation Y.

The Xbox One’s television-gimmick was unfairly dismissed.

Back at E3 2013, everyone pooh-poohed the Xbox One. Perhaps it was the TV, TV, TV, TV, sports, sports, television, television, TV, sports. 

“Xbox is about to become the next watercooler.”

After all, it’s supposed to be about the games, right? Surely a box under the TV that can do everything you need should only play bloody games, right?

Almost five years later, I decided to drop the ~$300 on an Xbox One S. I didn’t buy it to play games though. I had recently read in The Verge that Kodi had been ported to it and released in the Microsoft Store.

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Comic plot hole #1

“i scares people lmao”

 

From a friend:

“So like Scarecrow has this gas that shows you your worst fears but like what happens if your worst fear is being sprayed by Scarecrow’s gas? Do you get stuck in a loop?”

Checkmate DC.

Section 116

CC-BY: Con Tassios

For the benefit of people who believe that their religious beliefs trumps the civil rights of everyone else in a secular state, or believe that giving people civil rights will somehow limit their civil rights, I’ve posted a copy of Section 116 of the Constitution followed by some simple analysis of what it means.


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Media reform deals will reduce diversity and amount to little more than window dressing

The latest reforms will do nothing to prevent further concentration of Australia’s media landscape.

This article was originally published on The Conversation by its author Tim Dwyer, Associate Professor, Department of Media and Communications, University of Sydney. Read the original article.


The breakthrough in negotiations with the Senate crossbenchers that the government has been chipping away at over media reform has finally arrived.

The deregulatory legislation, the Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, required 38 votes to pass the Senate, where the Coalition controls 29 votes. It had already secured the support of three crossbenchers and four One Nation senators, but was waiting for just two votes to get it over the line – until Nick Xenophon did the deal.

After protracted negotiations with Xenophon and his NXT party, the Coalition has arrived at a quid pro quo deal that sees the repeal of the remaining cross-media diversity rules, after the government agreed to NXT’s proposal to introduce funding grants for small and regional publishers. Clearly, though, they are not the “substantial quid pro quo” for public interest journalism that Xenophon has trumpeted, which had previously included tax breaks.

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