Section 116

CC-BY: Con Tassios

For the benefit of people who believe that their religious beliefs trumps the civil rights of everyone else in a secular state, or believe that giving people civil rights will somehow limit their civil rights, I’ve posted a copy of Section 116 of the Constitution followed by some simple analysis of what it means.


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Media reform deals will reduce diversity and amount to little more than window dressing

The latest reforms will do nothing to prevent further concentration of Australia’s media landscape.

This article was originally published on The Conversation by its author Tim Dwyer, Associate Professor, Department of Media and Communications, University of Sydney. Read the original article.


The breakthrough in negotiations with the Senate crossbenchers that the government has been chipping away at over media reform has finally arrived.

The deregulatory legislation, the Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, required 38 votes to pass the Senate, where the Coalition controls 29 votes. It had already secured the support of three crossbenchers and four One Nation senators, but was waiting for just two votes to get it over the line – until Nick Xenophon did the deal.

After protracted negotiations with Xenophon and his NXT party, the Coalition has arrived at a quid pro quo deal that sees the repeal of the remaining cross-media diversity rules, after the government agreed to NXT’s proposal to introduce funding grants for small and regional publishers. Clearly, though, they are not the “substantial quid pro quo” for public interest journalism that Xenophon has trumpeted, which had previously included tax breaks.

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